6/26/2005

Hokusai

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Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) 葛飾北斎



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kigo for early summer

Hokusai Ki 北斎忌 Hokusai Memorial Day

宝暦10年9月23日〈1760年10月31日〉? -
嘉永2年4月18日〈1849年5月10日〉)

May 10

. Memorial Days of Famous Poeple .

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1817 Bunka 14, October 5,
.. at a public event held at Nishikake-sho,Nagoya,
Hokusai painted a Daruma.


1804 Bunka
Portrait of Daruma at Gokokuji temple in the Otowa District, Edo (dated April 13 ).


The Hokusai Museum

Katsushika Hokusai's depiction of ukiyo-e, the floating world, has a humble beginning as a plebeian skill during the Edo era (1603 - 1867). Over time, his works have achieved international acclaim, crossing boundaries of nationalities and periodic styles. It was here in Obuse, a town in Nagano Prefecture, that this man who is now known as a cultural giant produced masterpieces of his final years.

During his lifetime which began in 1760 in Honjo, Edo and ended in 1849 in Asakusa, Edo, Hokusai produced countless works of invaluable art. His exceptional talent first came to light in his late 30's with a series of bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women) under pseudonyms of Sori and Hokusai Tokimasa.

In his 40's and 50's, Hokusai's sensational innovations were reflected in his illustrations for yomihon and pictures for edehon books. His masterpiece FUGAKU SANJUROKKEI Thirty-Six Views of Mt. Fuji is a work from his 70's which gave way to a new genre of landscape prints for the art of ukiyo-e.

In his later years, Hokusai began to ignore the support of publishing critics and focused his individuality through brush painting. And with the help of his friend Takai Kozan, a tycoon in Obuse, Hokusai successfully completed his most celebrated works, massive ceiling pieces.

Hokusai Museum was established in 1976 to maintain the condition of valuable brush paintings and ceiling works attached to two festival floats. The museum building which underwent expansion and renovation in 1991 now displays Hokusai's works featuring brush paintings and book illustrations.
http://www.book-navi.com/hokusai/guide-e.html

Life and Works of Hokusai


人魂でゆく気散じや夏の原
hitodama de yuku kisan ja natsu no hara


now as a spirit
I shall roam
the summer fields


This last poem.

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1817.10
東都 画狂人 北斎 戴斗 (58歳)
「大達磨」文化十四年(1817)十月五日、名古屋西掛所での大達磨図
http://www.hokusai-paintings.com/01ckaimeif/04taito.html



葛飾北斎が文化14年に名古屋の西本願寺別院の境内で120畳敷大の大達磨絵を描いたイベントを記録した
http://www.geocities.jp/web_ukiyoe/umanotoh.html


北斎の大達磨の見せ物が行われた日(文化十四年10月5日)からほどなくして出された北斎の手紙。手紙といっても、内容は見せ物の主催者であった本屋の永楽屋へあてた借金証文である。事務的な文書を、挿し絵を使って当時流行の娯楽小説の一頁のように仕立ててあり、この非凡な画家の茶目っ気のある一面を見るようである。
http://bunka.nii.ac.jp/jp/heritage/detail/235011000090.html


Here we got him
百二十畳敷の大紙に、藁を束ねた特大の筆で大達磨を描くというイベントが、二百年ほど前の名古屋で行われた。立役者は、たまたま名古屋に寄宿していた浮世絵師の葛飾北斎。このセンセーショナルな見せ物の逐一を綴ったのが、この絵本である。この絵本の細密さには北斎も感心して、著者猿猴庵に芋の絵を贈っている。
A scene of Hokusai painting a large Daruma (of the size of 120 tatami mats)!



http://bunka.nii.ac.jp/jp/heritage/detail/235011000089.html

And one more

『ひよっとすると達磨じゃないか…』
とつぶやいた。その声の方をちらっと眺めた北斎は少し笑ってまた筆をとる。どうやら片方の紙に頭らしき絵が描かれた。会場の左右には六間ほど隔てたてて二本のスギの柱が立てられていたが、北斎は弟子に命じて描いた紙の端を紐で結び、静かにつりあげさせた。  
『ほお…』それを見ると人々の中から一斉にどよめきが起こった。そこにはまさに達磨の頭半分が見事に描かれていたのである。それからの北斎は大筆をふるって残りの画をつぎつぎに仕上げていく。そして吊り上げた紙を再び地上に戻し、最後に赤石丹朱などで色付けをしていった。絵が完全に仕上がったのは翌日であった。
北斎がこのとき描いた大達磨は百二十畳もの大きさがあり、画中に  文化十四丁丑年十月五日   東都画狂人 北斎戴斗席上と署名している。この画は数日の間一般に公開された。このとき葛飾北斎は五十七才、もっとも油の乗り切っている時代であった。

北斎が名古屋滞在中に描いた「大達磨画」は現存しないが、この画を見た高力種信という尾張藩士が模写を残しているので、当時の画の様子を知ることができる。

Painted when he was 57 years. The big Daruma he painted in Nagoya does not exist any more.



http://www6.ocn.ne.jp/~kameyama/bungei/aichikogan/tokaido126.htm


Here is the place where the temple Nishi Honganji stood, close to the Osu Kannon.
大須観



http://www.angel.ne.jp/~hutihata/inpaku/oosukan4.htm


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In 1844 at age 85, Hokusai visited Obuse and spent about six months working on the Ryu (Dragon) and Ho-o (Chinese Phoenix) paintings for the Higashi-machi Festival float.



http://www.book-navi.com/hokusai/art/houou-e.html

Read more in my story about the Phoenix in Asian Art .

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Daruma riding leaves and
crossing the sea to Japan




dated c.1820-40
Attr. To Hokusai or Oi, Hokusai's daughter.
Most probably Oi.

© www.the art of japan.com


Reference:
Daruma on a Rush-Leaf, , on a reed
Royoo Daruma 芦葉達磨


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Quoted from andreas.com

Hokusai (1760-1849)

Hokusai, Japan's best known artist, is ironically Japan's least Japanese artist. Japan's best known woodblock painting, The Great Wave, is very un-Japanese. Welcome to the artist often known as Hokusai.

Hokusai (1760-1849) lived during the Tokugawa period (1600 to 1867). In a Japan of traditional Confucian values and feudal regimentation, Hokusai was a thoroughly Bohemian artist: cocky, quarrelsome, restless, aggressive, and sensational. He fought with his teachers and was often thrown out of art schools. As a stubborn artistic genius, he was single-mindedly obsessed with art. Hokusai left over 30,000 works, including silk paintings, woodblock prints, picture books, manga, travel illustrations, erotic illustrations, paintings, and sketches.

Some of his paintings were public spectacles which measured over 200 sq. meters (2,000 sq. feet.) He didn't care much for being sensible or social respect; he signed one of his last works as "The Art-Crazy Old Man". In his 89 years, Hokusai changed his name some thirty times (Hokusai wasn't his real name) and lived in at least ninety homes. We laugh and recognize him as an artist, but wait, that's because we see him as a Western artist, long before the West arrived in Japan.

"From the age of six I had a mania for drawing the shapes of things. When I was fifty I had published a universe of designs. but all I have done before the the age of seventy is not worth bothering with. At seventy five I'll have learned something of the pattern of nature, of animals, of plants, of trees, birds, fish and insects. When I am eighty you will see real progress. At ninety I shall have cut my way deeply into the mystery of life itself.

At a hundred I shall be a marvelous artist. At a hundred and ten everything I create; a dot, a line, will jump to life as never before. To all of you who are going to live as long as I do, I promise to keep my word. I am writing this in my old age. I used to call myself Hokosai, but today I sign my self 'The Old Man Mad About Drawing." -- Hokusai

Hokusai started out as a art student of woodblocks and paintings. During the 600-year Shogun period, Japan had sealed itself off from the rest of the world. Contact with Western culture was forbidden. Nevertheless, Hokusai discovered and studied the European copper-plate engravings that were being smuggled into the country. Here he learned about shading, coloring, realism, and landscape perspective. He introduced all of these elements into woodblock and ukiyo-e art and thus revolutionized and invigorated Japanese art.

Read the rest with many interesting illustrations here:
http://www.andreas.com/hokusai.html


For more about Hokusai
With all the names and signatures of Hokusai
artelino.com


The complete works of Hokusai online, with high resolution images:
Mui An 無為庵
source : www.muian.com

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The Hokusai Manga
(北斎漫画, "Hokusai's Sketches")

is a collection of sketches of various subjects by the Japanese artist Hokusai. Subjects of the sketches include landscapes, flora and fauna, everyday life and the supernatural. The word manga in the title does not refer to the contemporary story-telling manga, as the sketches in the work are not connected to each other. Block-printed in three colours (black, gray and pale flesh), the Manga comprise literally thousands of images in 15 volumes, the first published in 1814, when the artist was 55.
The final three volumes were published posthumously, two of them assembled by their publisher from previously unpublished material.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


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Kobo Daishi practicing asceticism

弘法大師修法図 (Kooboo Daishi shuuhoo zu)

Painting by Hokusai, now at the temple Soujiji 總持寺.


© PHOTO www.nishiaraidaishi.or.jp / Soujiji

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.. .. .. Reference

Hokusai and His Age
Edited by John T. Carpenter



This profusely illustrated volume presents groundbreaking scholarship on the Ukiyo-e artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) and his immediate artistic and literary circles. Achieving worldwide renown for his dramatic landscape print series, such as the "Thirty-six Views of Mt. Fuji", Hokusai also excelled in book illustrations, erotica, and privately commissioned woodcuts called "surimono".

Aspects of the artist’s innovative and novel approach to the graphic arts are discussed in the first half of this volume. Less well known, Hokusai was a highly accomplished painter who oversaw a studio of several close pupils, including his daughter Ôi, who often worked in a style closely resembling his own. The study of Hokusai’s corpus of paintings thus raises many complex issues of authorship, dating and authenticity -- further complicated by the abundant production of forgeries both during and after his lifetime.

An appendix of recognized Hokuzai seals helps further clarify this aspect of the artist’s work. The distinguished roster of contributors includes: Asano Shugo, Gian Carlo Calza, John T. Carpenter, Timothy T. Clark, Doris Croissant, Kobayashi Tadashi, Kubota Kazuhiro Roger Keyes, Matsudaira Susumu, Matthi Forrer, Naito Masato, David Pollack, John M. Rosenfield, Timon Screech, Segi Shin’ichi, Henry D. Smith II, and Tsuji Nobuo.

Published by Hotei Publishing
http://styluspub.com/books/BookDetail.aspx?productID=70088


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Ehon Hayabiki 画本早引 Illustrations from Edo

. gannin boozu 願人坊主 mendicant monks .


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北斎-ヨーロッパを魅了した江戸の絵師

"Siebold & Hokusai and his Tradition"
Edo-Tokyo Museum till Jan. 27, 2008

My Information


26. August bis 24. Oktober 2011

The Martin Gropius Bau in Berlin is currently hosting Germany’s first major retrospective of the legendary Japanese artist Hokusai.
source : networkedblogs.com


Hokusai – Retrospektive
Hokusai - Rezeption in Europa
Gemeinsam mit der Japan Foundation, dem Japanisch-Deutschen Zentrum Berlin (JDZB), Sumida City und Nikkei Inc. Mit besonderer Unterstützung der Ishibashi Foundation.

source : www.berlinerfestspiele.de

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Hokusai’s wave
on her T-shirt:
she strokes my ankle


Alan Summers


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© Haiga by Emile Molhuysen, Delft, 2007


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. Japan after the BIG earthquake March 11, 2011


. Hokusai, the Great Wave and the Tsunami
北斎 津波  .

Male Wave 男浪 and Female Wave 女浪


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External LINKS

Ehon Hayabiki 画本早引 Illustrations from Edo
source : ehonhayabikiue

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3 comments:

shanna said...

pretty cool wave by emile

anonymous said...

Japan Times

Uncovering an ukiyo-e master in Obuse
By MANDY BARTOK

Known locally for its apples and sweet chestnuts, this rural community would likely have remained in wider obscurity were it not for the retirement plans of one of Japan's most famous artists — ukiyo-e (woodblock print) master Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849).

Hokusai's masterpieces rank among Japan's most recognizable works of art. His woodblock prints garnered immense acclaim throughout his career, but his fame was assured for posterity with the publication of the captivating series titled, "36 Views of Mount Fuji."

The striking images of a snow-capped Fuji are imprinted in many an ukiyo-e fan's mind; thanks to modern commercialism, they also grace everything from coasters to coffee mugs to canvas bags. And in Obuse, even the manhole covers — decorated with etchings of his famous "Great Wave off Kanagawa" — pay tribute to this acknowledged legend.

Hokusai first came to Obuse near the end of his life, at the behest of his patron, wealthy farmer and salt merchant Takai Kozan. Already in his 80s, the woodblock artist born in Edo (present-day Tokyo) had no intention of slowing down in his twilight years. Instead, in the peace and serenity of the countryside, he devoted himself to brush painting, breaking away from the genre of ukiyo-e to turn out masterpieces in the style of Chinese classical art, such as the striking "Dragon Flying Over Mount Fuji" (1849).

As death approached, he left many of his last works to the town and temples of Obuse. It's a move that has turned the quiet agriculture village into a key stop on the cultural tourist's trail.

Obuse also attracts visitors with its locally grown chestnuts. In shops around town, chestnut products abound, from baked goods and chestnut-themed set lunches to the ubiquitous chestnut-flavored ice cream cones. The sweet smell of roasting chestnuts wafting from the main square tantalizes many a hungry visitor, but if your nose needs a little assistance to track down the local treats, let the chestnut-decorated sidewalks steer you in the right direction.
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On a corner of Obuse's main square, the Hokusai Museum opened in 1972 and houses the town's best collection of the artist's work. Inside, two oversize festival-float panels take pride of place in a first-floor exhibition room. Bold strokes of color blend seamlessly together on the wood, capturing the forms of a dragon, a phoenix and opposing tsunami waves. The panels were designed to adorn the interiors of two grand floats, the Higashi-machi and Kan-machi ones that were used in the town's many shrine festivals.
In other rooms, visitors can examine Hokusai's exquisite scroll paintings or marvel at the detail of his early black-and-white ukiyo-e prints. Upstairs, a series of sketches showcasing peasant life rounds out the superb collection.

Outside the museum, a narrow chestnut-inlaid path leads past a group of renovated mustard-hued storehouses to the Takai Kozan Memorial Hall. Named for the art enthusiast who funded Hokusai's Obuse retreats, the manicured grounds of the courtyard contain the tiny studio where Hokusai worked on his final pieces.
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The storehouse museum also displays drawings by Kozan himself, though the hidden gem of this complex is the attached sake brewery. The Masuichi-Ichimura Brewery, owned by descendants of Takai Kozan, has been producing its popular sake for 254 years. The business is currently managed by an American woman named Sarah Cummings, an arrangement uncommon in the male-dominated realm of sake. Under her direction, the brewery recently switched back to the traditional use of oke barrels (wooden barrels held together with bamboo straps) in their sake production.

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On weekends and in the summer months, a tourist shuttle bus does the rounds of Obuse's major sights, mostly ferrying weary visitors out to Gansho-in Temple, the location of Hokusai's largest painting. I went in the off season, when walking was the only way to get there — but the 2-km hike was worth every step on the way, if only to peek into Obuse's many attractive backyard gardens. In an attempt to boost tourism and attract visitors, local officials have recently implemented the Obuse Open Garden program. More than 90 Obuse homes and businesses have since landscaped and opened their yards to curious visitors. So, if the sign is out and the gate is unlatched, feel free to walk in and enjoy the surroundings.

My half-hour ramble to Gansho-in Temple found me at the base of the region's often snow-covered peaks. Surrounded by vistas of apple orchards, the temple is a peaceful home to Hokusai's Chinese phoenix painting. The work was one of the artist's last, completed when he was 89 years old.

The best view of the phoenix, which glares down at visitors from the temple ceiling, is apparently from flat on one's back, as evidenced by the handful of visitors I spied lying across the room's benches. With a reassuring smile from the temple caretakers, I sprawled out on the tatami mats and gazed toward heaven. A magnificent Chinese phoenix spread its emerald- and tangerine-colored wings across the roof, illuminating the tiny hall. The paint Hokusai used was allegedly mixed with jewels, and the brilliant colors of the mythical bird have yet to fade, a fitting legacy for an artist as highly valued today as he ever was.
http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/fv20090329a1.html

Gabi Greve - WKD said...

Blind People and Elephant 盲人と象 - Hokusai

.